Google, Inc. Being Sued For Discrimination Of Their Female Employees Both Past And Present

September 14, 2017

 

 

by: Donald Cyphers Investigative Reporter

Syndicated by: Montana News

According to a law suit that was filed in the Clerk of the court in the Superior Court of California and in the County of San Francisco, the case was filed Sept 14, 2017 and the case number is CGC-17-561299.

 

The case alleges that Google is in violation of California Equal pay Act Labor code 1197.5 and 1194.5 and the failure to not pay all the wages due to various discharged and employees that had worked under the labor code 201-203, 11194.5 ;

Including the unfair and unlawful business practices Code 17200

 

The plaintiffs in this case are Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease and Kelli Wisuri and about 1,000 other females that are unnamed in this class action law suit.

 

The law suit is also on behalf of a class defined as all women who were employed by Google, Inc located in California

 

According to Court documents, Google has discriminated and continues to discriminate against female employees by systematically paying them a lower compensation that what Google, Inc would pay for male employees performing substantially similar work and under similar work conditions.

 

This is no justification for Google, Inc, to not pay women and men an equal compensation for substantially similar work and there is no law in the land that justified Google’s unlawfulness reason. to do such.

 

According to the defendants in this law suit Google was and has been for many years been involved in a systemic discrimination against women by paying them less than men for the same comparable work.

 

Google should have known, or at all relevant time’s  come to the realization of their pay disparity between female and male employees, yet Google failed to level out or equalize men’s and women’s pay for substantially the same similar work.

 

As a result of Google’s actions of discriminatory and unlawful pay, job assignment, and promotion policies and or practices, many class members and the plaintiffs were denied opportunities for fair wages during the class period and are all entitled to wages due interest thereon, and liquidated damages. 

 

The Plaintiffs want to seek declaratory and injunctive relief enjoining Google from continuing to pay women less than men for substantially the same or similar work including Google’s practice of segregating women into lesser compensated jobs than the men and failing to promote the women at the same rate or pace as men.

 

 

According to the Federal Contract Compliance Programs  OFCCP which is based out of the United States Labor Office,  Officers initiated a compliance review of Google’s Mountain View Headquarters.

 

A statistical regression analysis of the compensation data for all 21,000 employees at Google for the year of 2015.

 

That Compliance audit discovered that there  were systemic compensation disparities against women pretty much across the entire workforce. And that 6 to 7 standard deviations between pay for men and women in nearly every job classification in 2015

 

According to Government empirical data, these deviations means that this is a one in 100 million chance that the disparity is occurring randomly or just by chance as Google would like the public to believe.

 

It is interesting to know that Google routinely maintains and internal pay equity analyses on an annual basis

 

So it is easy to determine that Google also maintained many records of the wage rates for various job classifications and the conditions of employment of all its employees in the state of California.  At no time did Google take any steps in the Class Period to pay the women equally to men as required by the labor code 1197.5 et seq. according to Court records.

 

The allege allegations of the (3) named Plaintiffs are lengthy and very specific in nature against Google, Inc.  The Class members are an overall class action suit with many unnamed female defendants.

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